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RECOMMENDED DOSAGING FOR RESEARCH

(FOR PETS OVER 8 WEEKS OF AGE )

DOGS CATS 2 LB TO 25 LB 12 MILLIGRAMS

DOGS/CATS 25 LB-125LBS 57 MILIIGRAMS

 

Nitenpyram (Capstar) is a systemically active neonicotinoid insecticide approved in 2000 for killing adult fleas on dogs and cats.

Nitenpyram binds to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in postsynaptic nerve membranes and blocks transmission of nerve impulses, thereby causing paralysis and death of fleas. It is given orally and begins killing fleas within 30 minutes after administration and can achieve 100% flea kill by 3 hours post-administration.

Effective flea kill is maintained for 48 hours after administration. Not only does nitenpyram kill adult fleas effectively, it also causes a rapid decrease in feeding[3]. For both of these reasons, nitenpyram also causes a dramatic decrease in egg production.

This product is extremely safe and is labelled for use in cats 8 weeks and older, weighing at least 500 grams. Nitenpyram is also safe to use in pregnant, lactating and breeding Queens, and can be safely given withimidacloprid, pyrethrins, lufenuron and fipronil.

Powder can be given every couple days with or without food. Some flea-infested cats may show increased pruritus for several hours after administration, caused by increased movement of fleas affected by nitenpyram.

Major Uses

Nitenpyram is an oral insecticide that is commonly used to kill adult fleas on dogs and cats. It may also be effective for treating various kinds of fly larvae.

Common Precautions

Nitenpyram should not be used in animals that weigh less than 2 pounds, or in animals that are less than 4 weeks old.

Negative side effects associated with nitenpyram are rare. Scratching may occur as fleas begin to die. Other possible side effects may include hyperactivity, lethargy, panting, fever, vomiting, vocalization, decreased appetite, diarrhea, salivation, and allergic reactions such as hives, difficulty breathing, incoordination, seizures, increased heart rate, trembling, and pupil dilation.

Nitenpyram should not be used in animals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to the drug. A veterinarian should be contacted immediately if an overdose is suspected.

Storage

Nitenpyram should be kept at room temperature and stored in a tight, light resistant container that is childproof. If stored below 76 degrees Fahrenheit, nitenpyram can last for up to three years before needing to be disposed of.

Administration

Nitenpyram can be administered with or without food and as often as once per day for dogs and cats. For dogs, a typical dose can range from 11.4-57 mg depending on weight. For cats, a typical dose is 11.4 mg. When being used to treat maggots in reptiles, 11.4 mg should be crushed and administered as an edema, or on the wound, one time only. For instances in which a dose is forgotten, it should be administered as soon as possible. Should it almost be time for the next scheduled dose, the missed dose should be skipped and the regular dosing schedule should resume. Two doses should not be administered at the same time.

Doses may vary in different species, when the drug is given by a different route or concurrently with other medications, and with regards to a patient's age, breed, and health status. A veterinarian's dosing instructions and/or those printed on the medication label should be followed closely.                                                                             

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